Cybercrime as a Service: Six critical questions every business must answer if they want to minimise risk

Report Overview

Cybercrime as a Service: Six critical questions every business must answer if they want to minimise risk

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Cybercrime as a Service: Six critical questions every business must answer if they want to minimise risk
The rising costs of cybercrime are driven by an increase in online devices, more cyberattacks and the growing sophistication of cybercriminals and their toolkits

Contents

Key takeaways

The interconnected world brings business efficiency gains but also opens up attack vectors for cyber criminals

Wide spectrum of cyber-actors supported by Cybercrime as a Service toolkits

  • Script Kids
  • Hackers and Hacktivists
  • Professional Cybercriminals
  • Disgruntled Employees
  • Nation States
  • Zero Day Vulnerability Traders

Cyber threats are growing in frequency and complexity

  • Denial of Service Attacks
  • Phishing and Whaling Campaigns
  • Advanced Persistent Threats
  • Ransomware as a Service

The Impacts of Cybercrime on Organisations

Organisational Leadership – Six Key Questions

  • Q1: What data is important?
  • Q2: What are the potential costs of a loss of data?
  • Q3: Is the organisation aware of the risks?
  • Q4: Is there a plan to deal with a cyber incident?
  • Q5: Do we have the right resources?
  • Q6: Do we have the right reporting metrics?

List of charts/tables

Figure 1. Cybercriminal control of a Botnet Figure 2. Buying process for a Zero Day vulnerability with an intermediary Figure 3. ATO focused Phishing Attack Figure 4. WannaCry Ransomware Attack Screenshot Figure 5. Average number of days to resolve a cyberattack by type Figure 6. Functions Most Likely to be Affected by a Public Breach Figure 7. Drivers of the Rising Cost of Cyber Activity in Australia Figure 8. Average annualised cost by industry sector – across all six countries